EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

LOOKING AHEAD

newsletter January 2017
A new year begins. There’s always a sense of opportunity and good things to come, even for a grumpy old pair of glasses like me. So instead of looking for things to complain about, I’m going to focus on the good things this year will bring. So here’s a couple of events to “look” forward to in 2017. (See what I did there?) First up, there’s a total eclipse happening on August 21. Now we’ve talked about these before, so I’ve already been through the do’s and don’ts. (Don’t worry – I’ll go through them again in August, because you know I can’t resist a good old lecture.) For the United States, it’s the first total eclipse of the 21st Century, and it’ll last for 2 minutes and 40.2 seconds. Yup, strange and interesting times continue for the US. But let’s not get into that – I’m not one to discuss politics. Another big event will happen in October, when the official JFK assassination records go public for the first time. What’s that got to do with eyes? Nothing. I’m just saying. But hey, we’ve talked a lot about good reading habits. And it seems there will be lots of interesting reading to do. On a different note, no big sporting events this year. No Olympics, no FIFA World Cup, no Rugby World Cup. But this is South Africa. There’s no doubt we’ll find loads of other sports to watch on TV. What else will happen this year? I’m not one...
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THE ULTIMATE BEST FRIENDS!

EyeMark Jan 2017 6
A dog is man’s best friend, right? Well, he can be a dog’s best friend, too, as illustrated in the heart-warming story of Tanner and Blair. Blind since birth and suffering from severe and frequent epileptic seizures, Golden Retriever Tanner was left without a home when his beloved owner passed away. Unfortunately, because of the difficulty in managing his seizures and the need for round-the-clock care, a new home could not be found for him. He was placed in the care of an experienced vet at an animal hospital. At the same hospital, a black Labrador, Blair, was recovering from a gunshot. Although she had healed well physically, emotionally she was in a constant state of fear and anxiety. One day, as both dogs were out in the play yard together, Blair seemed to sense that Tanner needed help. She took Tanner’s leash in her mouth and led him around the yard, and this was the start of a strong healing bond for both dogs. The friendship has changed both Blair’s and Tanner’s lives for the better, each providing a sense of comfort for the other. Once without home or hope, the pair is now inseparable. Blair, once a nervous and timid victim of post-traumatic stress disorder, is now calmer and less apprehensive around others. And Tanner, once so incapacitated by seizures that left him completely panic-stricken, has improved by leaps and bounds as his seizures have reduced in frequency and severity. “We’ve worked with a lot of different service dogs...
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A TWINKLE IN THE EYE?

EyeMark Jan 2017 1
A beautiful eye colour can be a striking feature, but what about two beautiful eye colours?? Six out of every thousand people in the world have eyes that are different colours from each other, although in most of these cases the difference is so subtle, its hardly noticeable. This striking phenomenon is called Heterochromia Iridum, which literally means different coloured irises (the coloured area of the eye), and presents in various ways. With some people and animals only a segment of the iris is a different colour, or there may be a different coloured ring around the pupil, while others may have two completely different coloured eyes. Heterochromia is more common in dogs than in humans, and is commonly observed in sheep dogs, dalmations and huskies. Horses and certain breeds of cats have been found to have it, too. What makes a blue eye different than a brown eye, or a green eye different than a blue eye? It all comes down to pigment. Eye colour is determined by your genes and the combination of alleles you inherit from your parents. Alleles are segments within a gene, which are received from both parents. These alleles code for different levels of a pigment called melanin to be produced in the iris. Since each person receives genetic information from both parents, a child can have a completely different eye colour than both of the parents. Melanin is a pigment that is found in the skin and also the eyes. More melanin means darker...
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MYOPIA (NEARSIGHTEDNESS)

mytopia 1 jan 2017
The new school year is about to begin! Coupled with excitement and anticipation, comes anxiety about coping with the demands of the academic curriculum. Most learning in the classroom occurs through the eyes and the visual system. Are your child’s eyes up to these tasks? Sometimes, in the classroom situation a child manages to easily master tasks when working from a book, but may have difficulty doing the same activities if he needs to read work off the blackboard. At home, he may need to sit closer than normal to the TV, but may be able to enjoy the same movie comfortably on his i-pad. If this description fits your child, chances are he is shortsighted. Shortsightedness, or myopia, is a vision condition in which people can see close objects clearly , but objects farther away appear blurred . It is the most common refractive condition of the eye, and seems to be on the increase throughout the world. What is a refractive error? The cornea is the clear membrane in front of the eye. Together with the lens, the structure inside the eye that changes shape to help focus images, it bends or refracts incoming light to focus the image on the retina at the back of the eye. The point of focus must be precisely on the retina. The accuracy of refraction depends on the curvature of the cornea and the lens, as well as the length of the eye. If the cornea or lens isn't evenly and smoothly...
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