EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

MADIBA'S VISION


July is Madiba Month, a 31-day commemoration that includes Tata's birthday on the 18th. Many people have found many ways to celebrate the great man and his legacy. Cape Town decided to honour the humanitarian with a giant pair of "Mandela glasses" on the Sea Point promenade, staring into the distance towards Robben Island. Thing is, some people thought it was a kinda strange choice. Of all the things Madiba stood for, is he really most famous for his eyewear? Other folks pointed out that he didn't actually wear the kind of frame that now stands on the seafront. He's probably most famous for the teardrop shape he wore on Inauguration Day. Why didn't they put up a giant version of those? Anyways, it got me thinking about other famous pairs of glasses. I mean, what would you say if I asked you to name the most famous glasses in the world? (Take a moment to think about it before you keep reading... come on... there ya go...) Would you go with music and choose Buddy Holly's heavy black frames? After all, they're as famous as his timeless tunes. Would you stick with music and choose one of Elton John's many eccentric eye pieces? Or would you say John Lennon's round glasses are the most famous of all? I mean, could you "imagine" a more famous pair? (See what I did there? Imagine... heh, heh...) Speaking of circles, what about the rimless rounds that Steve Jobs always wore? They became as...
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NOT THE END OF THE WORLD; A DIFFERENT VIEW OF IT


One day at school I was day dreaming out of the window. All of a sudden I heard my name. Teacher: "Brad, what colour is that on the right page?" Me (Turning to the page): "Red." Teacher (Mad): "No! What colour is it really?" Me: "Green?" (Now I knew if something wasn't red it must be green) Teacher (Furious): "Stop playing games! What colour is it?" Without red and green, I had no clue. I started spouting out colours. Me: "Orange? Yellow? I don't know. I honestly don't know." Teacher: "It is brown! It is brown!" "Brown," I thought," I would never have guessed brown!" Many everyday tasks depend on the perception of colour, and people with colour blindness, or, more accurately, colour vision deficiency are challenged by tasks as simple as reading colour-coded information such as maps or charts, selecting ripe fruit and vegetables, identifying medication that is poorly labelled, or coordinating colours when buying clothes or deciding what to wear each morning. As in the example above, it can be particularly difficult for children at school where educational material is often colour-coded, or if they are unable to read a green board when yellow chalk is used. People who are able to perceive colours are often puzzled by the way in which colour blindness affects activities such as driving and the interpretation of traffic lights, for example, but it is possible to compensate and respond to other cues, such as the position of the lights. Most people with colour...
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NOT SIMPLY A SUMMER ACCESSORY


We usually associate sunglasses with long hot summer days, time at the beach or pool, iced drinks, and protecting our skins from the sun's harmful rays. Before you put away your sunglasses along with your sun screen until next summer, remember that sunglasses are not simply a summer item, but play a vital role in eye care, even in winter. TV and magazines are full of fashion eyewear and facts about the danger of UV rays to the eyes in summer, but they tend to neglect the fact that the sun still shines in winter. Although the winter sun is less intense than it is in summer and the UV rays are weaker, the winter sun can still damage the eyes. Being lower in the sky and at a different angle, it often shines directly into the eyes. The tissue that makes up the human eye is some of the most sensitive and vulnerable tissue in the body. The eye has many natural defenses that protect it from the sun's rays, including pupil dilation, the squinting reflex, and the concave shape of the eye socket, shielded by the brow. However, the eyes' natural defenses are not adequate in protecting them from all harmful UV radiation. Reflexes like squinting and pupil dilation are only triggered by the sun's visible light. That means that on cloudy days, the amount of UV light reaching the unguarded eye can be dangerous. Two different types of light enter the eye, namely ultra violet (UV) light and...
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SHINGLES AND THE EYES


Shingles is a medical condition that causes a painful blistering rash to form on the body and sometimes the face. It is related to the chickenpox virus, varicella zoster. If one has had chicken pox as a child, the virus remains dormant in the system, but can multiply in the nerve cells and re-emerge decades later. SYMPTOMS OF SHINGLES There are progressive stages to shingles. The first sign is a tingling or burning pain, often on one side of the body, usually in the area of the waist, back, chest or ribcage. Other symptoms may include a headache, low fever, fatigue or flu-like symptoms. Within two to three days, a rash will break out, with painful blisters appearing a few days later. The shingles virus travels along a nerve path, so the rash will often form a line along the body or face, typically localised to only one side. Eventually, the blisters will open, crust over, and heal. This can take anything from two to six weeks. The shingles rash will fade after a few weeks, but the pain can continue for weeks or months, as a result of nerve damage. This is more common in older adults, and in most people, the nerve pain will improve over time. SHINGLES IN THE EYE About 10 to 20 percent of people with shingles develop shingles in and around the eye. This type of shingles is called ophthalmic herpes zoster, or herpes zoster ophthalmicus. The symptoms tend to follow a similar course to...
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