EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

Interesting facts about your eyes

Your eyes: Are the most complex organs you possess except for your brain. Are composed of more than two million working parts. Can process 36,000 bits of information every hour. Under the right conditions, can discern the light of a candle at a distance of 14 miles. Utilize 65% of all the pathways to the brain. Can instantaneously set in motion hundreds of muscles and organs in your body. In a normal life-span, will bring you almost 24 million images of the world around you. The external muscles that move the eyes are the strongest muscles in the human body for the job that they have to do. They are 100 times more powerful than they need to be. The eye is the only part of the human body that can function at 100% ability at any moment, day or night, without rest. Your eyelids need rest, the external muscles of your eyes need rest, the lubrication of your eyes requires replenishment, but your eyes themselves "never" need rest. But please rest them!
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1068 Hits

How Do They See


We take for granted how we see the world around us, but have we ever wondered about how animals see? Recent scientific investigation has revealed an amazing world of vision diversity in the animal kingdom. Here are a few examples. Horses have an amazing range of vision due to their binocular vision, with their eyes located on the sides of their heads. But they cannot see what is right in front of them between their eyes, which is why they often look down as they walk. Old world monkeys and apes mainly see as humans do, so they pick up red, green, and blue. But many new world monkeys do not. In fact, in the same family of monkeys there can be up to six different types of colour blindness. As with their human cousins, color blindness is more common in males than in females. Many birds can see differently. Pigeons, for example, can see literally millions of different hues and are thought to be better at color detection than any animal on earth. Cats and dogs do not have strong vision. They rely primarily on scent and sound. Cats in particular have weak vision, and are colour blind. Dogs can sometimes tell the difference between yellow and blue, for example. Cats are best at focusing narrowly on one object (for hunting), and they do have better night vision than humans. Both dogs and cats have better perspective and depth perception, due to the placement of their eyes, than human beings...
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1023 Hits

“PINKEYE”


Conjunctivitis, also known as pinkeye, is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin clear tissue that lies over the white part of the eye and lines the inside of the eyelid. What Causes Conjunctivitis? Conjunctivitis has a number of different causes, including: Viruses Bacteria Irritants such as shampoos, smoke, and pool chlorine Allergies, like dust, pollen, or an allergy that affects some contact lens wearers Conjunctivitis caused by some bacteria and viruses can spread easily from person to person, but is not a serious health risk if diagnosed promptly. Conjunctivitis in newborn babies, however, should be reported to a doctor immediately. What Are the Symptoms of Conjunctivitis? The symptoms differ based on the cause of the inflammation, but may include: Redness in the white of the eye or inner eyelid Increased tears Thick yellow discharge that crusts over the eyelashes, especially after sleep Green or white discharge Itchy or burning eyes Increased sensitivity to light If you have any of these symptoms, see your optometrist, who will conduct an examination of your eyes and may use a cotton swab to take a sample of fluid from the eyelid to be analyzed in a lab. Bacteria or viruses that may have caused conjunctivitis can then be identified and proper treatment prescribed. How Is Conjunctivitis Treated? The treatment for conjunctivitis depends on the cause. Bacteria : Conjunctivitis caused by bacteria is treated with antibiotics, in the form of eye drops, ointments, or pills. The infection should improve within a week. Take or use...
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1062 Hits

Interesting facts about your eyes

Your eyes: Are the most complex organs you possess except for your brain. Are composed of more than two million working parts. Can process 36,000 bits of information every hour. Under the right conditions, can discern the light of a candle at a distance of 14 miles. Utilize 65% of all the pathways to the brain. Can instantaneously set in motion hundreds of muscles and organs in your body. In a normal life-span, will bring you almost 24 million images of the world around you. The external muscles that move the eyes are the strongest muscles in the human body for the job that they have to do. They are 100 times more powerful than they need to be. The eye is the only part of the human body that can function at 100% ability at any moment, day or night, without rest. Your eyelids need rest, the external muscles of your eyes need rest, the lubrication of your eyes requires replenishment, but your eyes themselves "never" need rest. But please rest them!
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831 Hits

Running with 'Vision'


Kenyan Henry Wanyoike is one of the world’s fastest runners. He had his first taste of victory as a teenager at an athletics meet for local schools, and went on to win national competitions. His dream was to represent Kenya internationally, and hopefully use his talent to help his family escape poverty. In 1995, tragedy struck when Henry suffered a stroke which left him blind. He sank into a deep depression, believing that his running days, and indeed his life, were over. “I was thinking I would rather die than face these challenges.” Henry’s mother Grace, desperate to help her son, took him to the Kikuyu Eye Clinic, where he met Dr Petra Verweyen, the chief of the Low Vision Project of the clinic, who helped him to find his way back into life by arranging for him to learn to knit. Slowly, his confidence returned and he began to run again with the assistance of the vice principal of the Machakos Technical Institute for the Blind. He won the 3km race at the school, and commented: “I started to see that I was able to do wonders.” The following year he won gold in the 5000m at the 2000 Paralympic Games in Sydney, and has gone on to win gold at three Paralympics and set two world records. With gratitude for the help he received, Henry promised himself he would help other blind people to become self-sufficient, as he had done. After winning his first gold medal in Sydney, he...
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799 Hits

Hello Spring, Hello Allergies


Spring is in the air – literally! Its that time of year we look forward to – the weather is getting warmer, the blossoms are out, and we can begin to pack away winter woollies Its also a time for some people when their eyes are red and itchy, their noses are runny, and they begin to unpack the allergy remedies. So, what is causing this reaction, and why does it happen to some people and not others? Symptoms of allergic reactions The eyes and nose are the two areas of the body typically affected by allergies to pollen in spring. The medical term for this is allergic rhinitis, and symptoms include swollen, itchy, red eyes, a runny nose and frequent sneezing. According to some authorities, allergies are a good sign which indicate that the immune system is functioning well to rid the body of irritants. Anatomy of an allergic reaction People inherit a certain genetic disposition towards allergies, so the tendency to be allergic is passed from parents to children. During allergy season, your body has an immune reaction when exposed to different substances, and forms allergy-specific antibodies (called immunoglobulins), which sit on cells in your eyes, nose, lungs and skin. The next time you come into contact with a particular allergen, your body reacts by releasing chemicals called histamines, leading to an allergic reaction. You can develop allergic rhinitis at any age, although it is most common in childhood or early adulthood, and usually decreases with age. Women are...
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1701 Hits

Interesting facts about your eyes

Your eyes: Are the most complex organs you possess except for your brain. Are composed of more than two million working parts. Can process 36,000 bits of information every hour. Under the right conditions, can discern the light of a candle at a distance of 14 miles. Utilize 65% of all the pathways to the brain. Can instantaneously set in motion hundreds of muscles and organs in your body. In a normal life-span, will bring you almost 24 million images of the world around you. The external muscles that move the eyes are the strongest muscles in the human body for the job that they have to do. They are 100 times more powerful than they need to be. The eye is the only part of the human body that can function at 100% ability at any moment, day or night, without rest. Your eyelids need rest, the external muscles of your eyes need rest, the lubrication of your eyes requires replenishment, but your eyes themselves "never" need rest. But please rest them!
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1137 Hits

YOUR CHILD'S VISION

Children in class
A literate population is the backbone of a functional society. Although an estimated 80% of our learning comes through visual processing, many children start school without having had any kind of visual assessment. Children with untreated vision problems are often at a disadvantage before they even start school. As technology advances and educators strive to get computers into schools, they sometimes overlook the most basic prerequisite for learning – good vision. What is "good" vision? One standard test determines whether a child can see letters on a chart from a certain distance. This test tells us that the child is able or unable to see the blackboard, but does not indicate the ability to work from a book or see a computer screen. A great deal of classroom activity involves close-up work, so near vision needs to be examined, too. What schools do Many of us assume, or at least hope, that teachers are aware of children's vision problems and that these will be addressed by them. A number of years ago, in a grade 6 classroom, a bright child failed a maths test. Her teacher was concerned, decided to investigate further, and found that the child had copied many questions incorrectly from the blackboard. The parents were called in, the child's vision was examined, glasses were prescribed for blackboard work, and the child continued her school career successfully. The child had been unaware that she had a problem, as had her parents, but thanks to a dedicated teacher, it was...
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Protecting your eyes during sport

Caution: Eye protection required
Protect your eyes while playing sport South Africans were shocked recently by the freak accident of Proteas cricketer and popular sports personality, Mark Boucher. Boucher was struck in the left eye by a bail, abruptly ending his international cricket career. Although reports from his doctor are heartening, and Boucher may be on the local cricket pitch again, this incident does make us aware of the need to protect our eyes while playing sport. Of course good vision is critical for performance in most sports, but in addition to providing sharp vision, sports eyewear offers a number of additional benefits to help sports enthusiasts perform at their highest level. Protection from impact-related injuries No one can perform at their best during sports if they are worrying about an injury, and experts agree that many injuries can be prevented with protective eyewear. Compared to regular eyewear which is not designed to offer protection during sport, sports eyewear offers impact resistance and eye protection. Safety goggles with polycarbonate lenses are up to 10 times more impact resistant than regular lenses. While safety eyewear should be considered for every activity that has the potential for eye injury, it is essential for certain sports, such as cricket, baseball, hockey, football, squash, even soccer. Paintball “war games” are another activity for which safety eyewear is a must. Protection from UV A danger during outdoor sports, even in winter and on cloudy days, is ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Excessive exposure to UV rays has been associated...
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887 Hits

Macula Degeneration and Diet


Spinach, the new “carrots” for the eyes! What is macula degeneration? Everything we look at directly is identified by the macula, the area of the eye responsible for our sharp central vision. The macula consists of densely packed cells called photoreceptors. When light hits these photoreceptors, the signal is transmitted through to nerves that lead to the vision centre of the brain. In macular degeneration or other diseases of the macula, the photoreceptors are damaged and unable to transmit the image to the brain effectively. The effect of this is loss of visual detail, like face recognition or words on a page.macula. What causes Macular Degeneration? Damage to the macula occurs when molecules in and around the area of the macula are “oxidized”, or broken down. UV light is an “oxidant”, and is therefore one of the culprits that can cause breakdown of integral components in and near the macula. Another major cause of oxidation in the macula is smoking. Smokers and people with poor diets are exposed to more oxidants through the blood stream than non-smokers and people with healthy diets, leading to greater risk of macular degeneration. There is also a strong genetic component in some people, so they may smoke and have a poor diet and develop macular degeneration, while someone else may have the same habits and not develop it. Can Macular Degeneration be prevented? Diets high in antioxidants have been shown to reduce the risk of developing macular degeneration. The National Eye Institute sponsored an Age...
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