EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

SEEING IN COLOUR


  April is that time of year when the mornings are chillier, the evenings are darker, and the leaves on the trees turn spectacular shades of... I don't know. Orange and red. I know I was about to get poetic there, but then I remembered I'm no poet. I'm just an old pair of glasses going on about the way I see the world.   But yeah... colours of leaves. Green turns to red. That's what April is all about in its autumn glory and all. But if you think about it, April is a time for other colours too.   On April 27 we'll remember how a major change swept across our country, and we found ourselves living in what became known as the very colourful Rainbow Nation.   Now, my friend Rose is a... well, no surprises here... a pair of rose-tinted glasses. And she says everything's been perfect since 1994. Me? I'm a little less rose-tinted myself, and I gotta say we have a lot of work to do. But even I can admit that we've come a long way. And this is the month where we stop and remember that.   Plus, our new democracy also gave us a new flag. Talk about colours... it probably contains more colours than any other flag in the world. Sure, there were people at the time who said it looked like a beach towel. Others said they'd never get used to it. But - as the millennials would say -...
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LOOK ME IN THE EYE


Eye contact has been compared to the fairy tale of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" - too much may be interpreted as rude, too little may make a person appear uneasy or disinterested, while just the right amount produces feelings of mutual trust and interest. Eye contact is an integral and powerful part of non-verbal communication, is often linked to facial expression and sends out messages that are not always picked up with words alone. However, it is not as simple as the Goldilocks theory would suggest. There are different types of eye contact, and the interpretation of acceptable eye contact differs from culture to culture, situation to situation, personality to personality, gender to gender and even extends to the eyes in photographs and paintings. Making and Breaking Eye Contact Making eye contact with someone acknowledges that person and shows that you are interested in them. In some cultures, however, it is interpreted as rude to make eye contact with people in authority or of the opposite sex. Breaking eye contact can indicate that the person has lost interest, disagrees with what has been said or feels threatened. During conversation we frequently look away and back again, to prevent the discomfort of prolonged eye contact. When a person is feeling uncomfortable, he may rub one eye or pretend to have something in his eye, giving him an opportunity to break eye contact by turning his head away. Avoiding Eye contact We tend to avoid eye contact when we feel that our...
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SEEING THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE-COLOURED LENSES?


Contact lenses have a rich history that dates back to the 1500s, when Italian artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci first conceived of them. While his idea was only a sketch and was highly impractical, it was the beginning of centuries of contact lens innovation which continues to develop. Today contact lenses are a part of everyday life for millions of people around the world. With the rapid advances in technology, not only have the materials evolved for better comfort and durability, but the availability of colours and patterns has grown, making coloured contact lenses an important feature in the world of movies and a cosmetic accessory in the wardrobes of many people.   Human eye colour is determined by two factors, the pigmentation of the iris (the coloured part of the eye) and the way the iris scatters the light passing through it. The amount of melanin in the iris is genetically determined; the more melanin, the darker the eye. Sometimes eye colour appears to change depending on variations in light and the way in which this is reflected by the iris.   Coloured contact lenses fall into three basic categories, each of which serves a slightly different purpose and has a different role to play in modifying the colour of the eyes.   As their name implies, enhancer contact lenses are designed to highlight the natural beauty of the eye colour, boosting it or subtly changing its tint. They are particularly meant for people who have light coloured eyes...
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A TWITCH IN TIME ....


Everyone has them from time to time. Everyone finds them irritating. No-one knows exactly what causes them. But they usually don't last long and are seldom a cause for concern. Eyelid twitches or myokymia are painless repetitive involuntary spasms of the muscles of the eyelids. They usually occur in the upper eyelid but can occur in both the upper and lower lids and are more prevalent during the day than at night. Episodes of eyelid twitching are unpredictable, typically occurring every few seconds for a minute or two. They may appear on and off for a day or two and then disappear for weeks or months. While most twitches resolve on their own, in rare cases they may be early warning signs of an underlying disorder which requires medical intervention. CAUSES The specific causes of eyelid twitching are usually unknown, although certain factors may be identifiable as triggering them or making them worse. These are usually related to life style.   Stress - Stress is often a reason for eye twitching. If associated with a particular stressful situation such as exams, it usually resolves once the stressful situation comes to an end. Meditation or just sitting quietly with closed eyes for a few minutes can help reduce stress and eye twitching, if not alleviate them completely.   Caffeine or alcohol - It is thought that the stimulants in caffeine and/or the relaxant effects of alcohol can bring on a twitchy eyelid, especially when used in excess. It is often difficult to...
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GATEWAY TO LEARNING


School Health Week in March served as a reminder of the need to be aware, not only of general health, but of eye health and the essential role vision plays in the classroom. Learning is a complex process which requires integration and coordination between a number of modalities, including hearing, vision, language, and physical and cognitive abilities. We all have different learning styles and strengths. Some people learn most effectively by looking, others by listening, and still others by doing. The large majority of the demand in the classroom is on the visual system, increasing as children progress through school, when more study materials need to be read, print in books becomes smaller, and more time is spent studying and working on the computer. Optimal vision for learning is not simply being able to see clearly but involves visual processing skills and the ability to make sense of what is seen. Less than optimal visual skills may lead to poor academic and sporting performance, a negative attitude towards school, and emotional and social problems.   Although visual processing skills can be broken down for the sake of definition, they do not function independently of each other. They are an integrated system of processes that work together to facilitate effective learning and interpretation of information coming in through the eyes. Visual Acuity Visual acuity is a measure of the sharpness of vision or how clearly one is able to see at various distances. Problems that could impact school performance include difficulty with...
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SEE YOUR WHOLE WORLD, NOT JUST PART OF IT!


The annual World Glaucoma Week in March may have come and gone but unfortunately glaucoma is here to stay! Glaucoma is an irreversible progressive condition of the eyes caused by damage to the optic nerve at the back of the eye. After diabetic eye disease, it is the most common cause of blindness in the Western world if left untreated. The 2018 theme for World Glaucoma Week was B-I-G, Beat Invisible Glaucoma. This is an excellent incentive to visit your optometrist for a glaucoma screening, which is a quick and painless measurement of the pressure inside the eyes. Most cases of glaucoma are due to a build-up of pressure within the eye, gradually causing damage to the optic nerve which connects the eyes to the brain. However, some people who have optic nerve damage have relatively normal intra-ocular pressure but may have poor or compromised blood supply to the optic nerve and the retina at the back of the eye. For this reason, it is important to have a regular comprehensive eye examination of the internal structures of the eyes as well. Glaucoma is most prevalent in people over the age of 60 but can occur in younger people. Some experts recommend glaucoma screening every 5 years from the age of 40, or earlier and more frequently if there are risk factors for the development of the condition. Risk factors include a family history of glaucoma, a high degree of shortsightedness or farsightedness, diabetes, trauma to the eye (even many years...
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621 Hits