EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

THE EYES OF MARCH

newsletter January 2017
As we all know, March is Human Rights Month. So, which human are you? Are you the human who sits on a pair of glasses at least once a month? No? Then maybe you’re the human who’s left a pair of glasses at every restaurant in the city. Or could you be the human who sits on your glasses in a restaurant, and then leaves them behind in that very same restaurant? Speaking of restaurants, are you the human who’s too shy to wear a pair of reading glasses? Yup, you’re prepared to look silly by squinting at a menu or holding it ten feet away, but you won’t risk looking “silly” by wearing a pair of readers. (And admit it… you’ve ordered the wrong meal more than once because you couldn’t read the menu.) Or are you the human who wears sunglasses inside and outside, day and night? You think it fits with your “image” and gives you some “swag”. You imagine people think you’re pretty cool. Only you don’t know which people you’re talking to, because you can’t see them. Maybe you’re the human who loses your glasses and simply wears your prescription sunglasses all the time. You know who I’m talking about… the human who walks through the supermarket squinting through a pair of dark shades. I once met a human who lost one pair of glasses too many, so she learned to watch TV through her prescription shades. On the subject of viewing habits, are you the...
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SAFETY IN THE HOME FOR A PERSON WITH A VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

March17 10
As we get older, our senses begin to deteriorate, and many seniors choose to move in with a loved one or live in an assisted living facility before their safety becomes compromised. However, more and more seniors are choosing to age in place so that they can stay in their home as long as possible, and the good news is, with a few simple modifications, many homes can easily be prepared for an individual with a visual impairment. Having had the personal experience of having to modify an old farmhouse to accommodate a visually impaired relative, Jackie Waters shares her awareness of potential hazards. She offers useful practical suggestions on how to minimise obstacles and make a home as safe as possible for an individual with a visual impairment. The key is to make the space as functional as possible while maintaining safety; for instance, seniors are prone to falls, so floors need to be well taken care of and any clutter will need to be removed from walkways. Keeping a clean, open environment is one of the most important parts of making a home safe and livable for a senior with a vision impairment. Check the floors All floors throughout the home should be well-tended. Hardwood floors are best for seniors as they provide a good, sturdy walking surface, but if the home is carpeted, the carpet should be in good shape. Throw rugs should be fairly new and tacked down to the floor beneath to prevent a trip hazard,...
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SCHOOL HEALTH WEEK

March17 4
March 4th- 8th marks School Health Week, during which a School Health Screening Programme will be rolled out, bringing basic health screening to children at schools in areas that have been identified as priority health districts. The programme will test the eyesight, hearing and basic oral health of children in Grade 1 and the foundation phase. Children spend the majority of their week in their school environment, so schools play a big role in helping them learn the habits of a healthy lifestyle early on. Here is an opportunity to raise awareness of children’s health in all schools as well as at home. Concern is growing throughout the world as the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes in children increases. These chronic diseases have far-reaching consequences beyond childhood into adolescence and adulthood, with effects ranging from cardio-vascular disease to visual problems. By teaching healthy habits from an early age, long-term health issues can be avoided. WHAT CAN SCHOOLS DO? With the challenges of both hunger and obesity in South African children, the types of food sold in school tuck shops have an important role to play. By offering healthier food options in tuck shops, children will learn to make healthier food choices. Provide a variety of opportunities for physical activity before, during and after school. Children should engage in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Schools can add physical activity to their daily programmes, and encourage children to go outdoors and play during breaks. Immunisation is a...
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GLAUCOMA FACTS AND FIGURES

March17 1
Glaucoma is the name given to a group of eye diseases in which the optic nerve at the back of the eye is slowly destroyed, usually due to increased pressure in the eye, although it may occur with normal eye pressure. In some cases, the damage may be caused by poor blood supply to the vital optic nerve fibres, a weakness in the structure of the nerve, and/or a problem in the health of the nerve fibres themselves. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Worldwide about 66 million people are affected with glaucoma. About 10 % of these become blind due to glaucoma. In South Africa it is estimated that about 200,000 people are affected. The shape of the eye is achieved through the circulation of a clear fluid (aqueous), which bathes and nourishes the eye, keeps it firm and gives the eye a certain pressure. High pressure left uncontrolled can lead to damage of the optic nerve and result in vision loss. Eye pressure varies from person to person - what is high pressure for one person may not be for another. Glaucoma is referred to as the “silent thief of sight” because it is a largely invisible disease of the eyes, and there are usually no symptoms, so it often goes undiagnosed until late in its progression. Glaucoma can present at any age, although the commonest type, primary open angle glaucoma occurs after the age of 40 years. Although rare, one can be...
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