EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

Achtober


So close but so far. Whoever invented that expression must have been talking about October. Or - as my friends and I like to call it - Achtober. Because ach, who's got the energy to pull through two more months until the end of the year? Now my friends and I are just a bunch of glasses (with a few sunglasses among the group). But we figure we understand how you feel. And so... If you're feeling bleary and grimy like a dirty lens, take some time out for yourself. You know, some Me Time (or in your case You Time... you know what I mean.) If you can't take a weekend away, go out for a night or spend an hour at the spa. My friend Sandra is a pair of old cats-eye glasses whose lenses hadn't been wiped in months. Just one rejuvenating treatment with a soft cloth and she felt brand new. If you feel like your arms and legs are falling off, take some time for exercise in between all the typing, driving and other draining activities. My friend Doug is a pair of wayfarers whose hinges almost came apart. He couldn't even fit properly onto his owner's face. Rest that weary body of yours. And - like Doug did - get your hinges adjusted as and when necessary. Maybe a yoga session is all you need. If you're generally feeling bent out of shape, you might require the likes of physio or even acupuncture (if that's...
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CURVES IN THE WRONG PLACES!


What Is Astigmatism? Astigmatism is the most common vision problem. It is caused by an error in the shape of the cornea or lens of the eye. Normally, the cornea and lens are smooth and curved equally in all directions, helping to focus light rays sharply onto the retina at the back of the eye. However, if the cornea or lens isn't smooth and evenly curved, it can change the way light passes or is refracted onto the retina, resulting in a so-called refractive error Corneal Astigmatism The cornea is a transparent layer of tissue that covers the front of the eye. A perfectly curved cornea bends, or refracts, light as it enters the eye so that the retina receives a perfect image. In a person with corneal astigmatism, the cornea is oval-shaped rather than perfectly round, with the result that the light rays will focus on two points on the retina instead of one. Lenticular Astigmatism Lenticular astigmatism, which is less common than corneal astigmatism, occurs when the lens has variations that cause images to reach the retina imperfectly. They may focus either in front of or beyond the retina, causing blurred vision of both far and near objects. Most people with lenticular astigmatism have a normal-shaped cornea. What Causes Astigmatism? It is not known what causes astigmatism, but it is thought to be an inherited condition. It is often present at birth, but may develop later in life, sometimes after eye disease, injury or surgery. Who is at Risk...
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THE STORY OF THEMBI AND THE SINGING TREE


October 12th is WORLD SIGHT DAY, a day on which eye care awareness and universal eye health are emphasised. In South Africa, the theme of this year's World Sight Day is "Make Vision Count", and a number of community projects and awareness programmes are carried out. The story of "Thembi and the Singing Tree" is a moving account of the importance of drawing attention to the need for eye care awareness in children. Ken Youngstein is an American psychologist who spent many years in several countries in Africa working in the healthcare sector. In 1978 he set up a company with the aim of developing medical educational programmes for both professionals and patients. Based first in New York City and later in Zurich, he spent time each year providing these services to charities and government organisations throughout Asia and Africa. According to him, his greatest challenge was finding the right message and the right medium to reach each target audience, and to deliver information that was relevant and culturally appropriate for each group. In 2016, Youngstein met a man who worked for Orbis, an organisation which works with local partners to develop their capacity for accessible, high quality, sustainable eye-health services for all. By training doctors, nurses and community members, and conducting outreach services to communities, they act on their belief in "a world where no one is needlessly blind or visually impaired". Together they aimed to develop an educational toolkit that Orbis and their partner clinics could use to educate...
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WHEN SHOULD CHILDREN GET GLASSES?


Babies are not born with perfect vision. It is normal for them to be farsighted with some astigmatism until they are able to see well at about one year old as the brain and visual system mature. In children whose vision does not correct itself spontaneously with growth and maturation, the most common errors are refractive errors. These are caused when the shape of the eye does not correctly focus the light rays entering the eye. They include shortsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia) and astigmatism. With myopia, a child can see objects clearly close up, but has trouble seeing further away (like the classroom blackboard). Myopia is most commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 8 and 12, usually gets worse during the teenage years, but stabilises in early adulthood. If the child is farsighted, words on a page will seem blurry, but distance vision is not as much of a problem. Hyperopia is particularly common in young children, but they may not notice any blurriness because their eyes can compensate by focusing. Astigmatism distorts or blurs vision for both near and far objects. It happens when the cornea is irregularly shaped, and is more like a rugby ball than like a soccer ball. Myopia and hyperopia can be combined with astigmatism, or astigmatism can occur on its own. Warning signs Most children should have their first vision assessment at 3 to 4 years of age, but a visit to the optometrist may be advisable earlier if there is a family...
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