EyeMark Newsletters

A list of all our EyeMark Newsletter Articles

ALL EYES ON SPRING


The sun starts shining and the flowers come out. You can't wait to drive into the countryside and frolic in a field of yellow. (Okay, I've never frolicked in my life but you know what I mean...) So you park your car on a green, green hillside and throw open the door. You take a deep breath, step onto the grass… and step right back into your car. Because your eyes are itching so bad it feels like there are baby ants dancing on your eyeballs. As if the season of blooming flowers isn't enough, spring also happens to be the season of love. So instead of leaving those blossomy irritants in the countryside where they belong, people pick them and sell them at a massive profit to lovers everywhere. You know how it works – supply and demand. The demand for romance is so high that suddenly the cities are full of flowers too. And no matter where you try to hide, that pollen will find you and work its special magic on your eyes. Then there's the all-too-famous red eye. Like I said, spring is the time for romance, which also means it's the time for romantic movies. So maybe your eyes are red because you've cried your way through a tearjerker starring Sandra Bullock. Not that you'd tell anyone that. The whole reason why cinemas are dark inside is so people can cry to their heart's content. So maybe the red-eye is from crying through a love story....
Continue reading
  646 Hits
646 Hits

"Tis but a scratch!" - FOCUS ON EYEWEAR CARE


Glasses are an investment in time and money. You spend time choosing a suitable frame and discussing the most appropriate lenses for your vision needs with your optometrist. You wait for your new glasses to be made up and adjusted to fit correctly, and getting used to them may take a little while. They are not a cheap item, and you are unlikely to buy another pair for a while, so it is important to look after your glasses and keep them in the condition that facilitates optimal vision. Mid-September is the start of EYE CARE AWARENESS MONTH, when caring for your eyewear is as important as caring for your eyes. CLEANING YOUR GLASSES Washing you glasses at least once a day will keep the lenses in an optimal state, and avoid you having to strain to see through smudged or dirty lenses. Hold your frames by gripping the piece that crosses the bridge of the nose, rather than one of the ear pieces. This will prevent you from accidently bending the frame while you clean. Rinse with water before wiping and cleaning them. Particles of dust and dirt on the lens can be abrasive if you wipe over a dry lens. If possible, allow your glasses to air dry, which will prevent any abrasive materials from getting onto the lenses and scratching them. If you can't leave them to air dry, wipe them gently with a soft clean cloth; your optometrist may supply you with one. Wash the cloth regularly....
Continue reading
  1363 Hits
1363 Hits

GLAUCOMA - A PERSONAL STORY


Why is award-winning actress, Emma Thompson, worried about losing her sight? Both her mother and her maternal grandmother, and probably her great-grandmother, have been affected by glaucoma, a hereditary eye condition which has sometimes been described as "the silent thief of vision". In the healthy eye, a clear fluid, aqueous humor, circulates in the eye. Constant eye pressure is maintained by a balance between the production of this fluid and its drainage from the eye. With glaucoma, the pressure gradually builds up, slowly causing damage to the optic nerve which sends signals from the retina at the back of the eye to the brain. Over time, the damage to the optic nerve results in irreversible vision loss. One sufferer from glaucoma commented that "sight lost really is hindsight"! Although the vision loss cannot be reversed, its progress can be slowed down or even stopped by timeous management of the condition. Unfortunately, because glaucoma develops slowly without obvious symptoms at first, many people are unaware that they have it until they notice changes, usually in their peripheral vision. At this stage, there is already some damage to the optic nerve. For this reason, it is essential that eye pressure is checked by your optometrist regularly, particularly if there is a family history of glaucoma, or other risk factors. These include extreme short-sightedness, previous eye injury, or health conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Emma Thompson and her mother, Phyllida Law, reinforce the fact that early detection is the key to early...
Continue reading
  1198 Hits
1198 Hits

NOT QUITE "IN THE PINK"!


Most of us have experienced "pink eye" or conjunctivitis at some time in our lives, either as children or adults, or both. We have woken up with red burning eyes that we struggle to open because of the discharge gluing them together. Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the thin clear membrane over the white of the eye (sclera) and the inside of the eye lid. Not generally a serious health risk, it can be contagious, spreading easily from person to person. There are a number of different kinds of conjunctivitis, each with their own cause, symptoms and treatment, although the symptoms are sometimes similar regardless of the cause. BACTERIAL CONJUNCTIVITIS Bacterial conjunctivitis generally affects both eyes, or may start in one eye and spread quickly to the other. It is an infection caused by a bacteria which may come from the person's own skin or upper respiratory tract, or have been caught from another person with conjunctivitis. Bacterial conjunctivitis is characterised by redness, itching and a discharge which crusts over the eyelids and lashes, particularly on waking from sleep. There is a feeling of grittiness in the eyes and may be an increased sensitivity to light. This type of conjunctivitis is usually treated with antibiotic drops or ointment, and should clear within a few days. Discharge and crusting can be cleaned with cotton wool dipped in cooled boiled water. Even if left untreated, most cases will clear up on their own within a couple of weeks. VIRAL CONJUNCTIVITIS This is usually...
Continue reading
  694 Hits
694 Hits